Plogue Chipsounds Gameboy DMG Wave Channel Tutorial

gbA while ago I had some requests for how to use the DMG wave table in Plogue Chipsounds. I just finally got around to putting it together. Although its hard to get the exact same sounds you can get in LsDj when it comes to using the wave channel, you can get a pretty good approximation.

Many of the cool sounds you get out of LsDj come from the start and end point and speed settings for filtering. These help you get those “blarg” (that’s what I call them) sounds and some of the really noisy, buzzy Gameboy sounds that have come to define its sound.

Chipsounds doesn’t have the start/end/speed setup like LsDj but you can get the same effect using the wave sequencer. Here’s a few settings to get you started. If you haven’t learned the wave table in Chipsounds, read this first.

Select the DMG-CPU preset and the Wave channel of course. Pick a Wave Channel preset to start with. We will customize it later.

Set PMode to one fo the following options:

  • PWM – A more subtle pulse modulation effect.
  • PWM+Copy – This causes the distorted “blarg” sound and is the most in-your-face modulation.
  • Modulo – More subtle, almost gives you an Atari SID sound.
  • Seek – Turns the modulation into an arpeggio-like effect.
  • Trunc – Another subtle effect.

blarg

The next step is to build a Wave sequencer table that turns the PWM ratio up or down. This is CC2, as you can see in the photo, you can increase it in small steps with a very fast speed to get some smooth sounds.

Youc an also use CC29 to change the Pmode mid-table as well as VPOS (CC28) to further change the effect.

The wave channel setup greatly effects the sound. The more you squish down your wave, the more you will hear the effects. Here are some examples:

 

 

The “Blarg” Mouth Sound

A very flat wave shape. Wave table increases the PWM Ration by 5 in 1/96th increments.

blarg

Jagged Lead – Often hear in Chipocrite and Bit Shifter’s stuff.

Wave Shape is rather jagged and odd. PWM Ratio moves up and down mostly in 1/48th increments. You can turn on looping for a real fun sound with this one.

bitshifter

Trashy Bass – this is a very distorted and fun one.

CC28 VPos starts at 1 and PWM Ratio climbs, VPOS jumps to 127 after a few increments increasing the distorted sound and giving it a slower attack feeling.

trash

Squirt – A real subtle one I like.

Same as Trashy but using modulo instead of PWM+Copy for the PMode. A bouncy fun Atari-like sound.

squirt

Hope that helps. Just experiment from here and you can get some really epic sounds out of this module.

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Lucky Kat Studios releases Nom Cat with Beatscribe Sound and Music

I am back from hiatus to announce a new game just released with my productions. We are approaching a cat singularity on the Internets. And with good reason. Cats are awesome. Nom Cat is a new game from Lucky Kat studios where you have to feed our furry friends and help them avoid bombs. The game has a variety of backgrounds and lots of cool items you can buy to dress up your cat (I love the fro particularly). The gameplay is simple but harder than it looks initially.

Screen Shot 2015-05-21 at 1.48.45 PM

For the music we mostly used the DMG-01 chip from the gameboy but added a few more layers than you’d get out of the real gameboy. One of the challenges was creating an accordion sound for the France level in 8-bit chip limitations. Since the accordion is a very imprecise instrument, it helped to use multiple pulses with different attack rates at different octaves. It gave it that slightly ‘sloppy’ feeling that defined such a organic instrument like the accordion.

The game also includes avatars of famous instagram cats, check #instanomcat to see all the celebrity cats available. Some of the proceeds also go to help cat charities, so you can’t go wrong with this! Get this game right meow!

[iOs] [android]

StarTales Interactive Releases MegaBird with Beatscribe 8-bit NES Soundtrack

Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 10.58.37 AMThe Flappy Bird styled app has been providing tons of simplistic fun for a while now. It’s cool to see some new games that expand on the original formula. Megabird is one such game. It includes bosses and other features you don’t always see in these kind of games. For the soundtrack, we went straight to inspiration from one of the classics, Megaman II. It’s clear that the creator was heavily inspired by the classic genre on this game too. Check it out today!

Tutorial: Recreating the Quick Man Song With Plogue Chipsounds

I love watching waves...

I love watching waves…

Plogue Chipsounds is one of the most comprehensive and powerful sound modules for creating classic game console chip sounds. However, if it’s interface might not be the most obvious and intuitive when you first start to use it.

Why would you want to use an Audio Unit/VST instead of the actual hardware or a tracker? Well, for adding some quick chip sounds to an existing song or remixing a classic song, it’s super useful to have everything happening in MIDI. You can speed things up, transpose them and make changes without having to spend time outside of your main DAWS. Whenever I want some Nintendo triangle bass, I go straight to chipsounds!

The Quick man track is one of the most amazing classic NES songs ever. It’s just buzzing with electrical goodness and really makes the intense Quickman level even more amazing. In just a few minutes, you can create a pretty accurate sound in Chipsounds.

I have to say that I really love the respect that the author of Chipsounds has for the classic chips. Chipsounds conforms to what the chip its emulating could actually do and won’t let you play ten notes on the NES chip. This helps keep things accurate. The tool is definitely worth the cost and I’ll be covering some of the other features in later tutorials. I also love their statement about “preserving endangered chip species”; there are some amazing sounding chips from obscure systems which create some amazing classic sounds. Definitely worth looking into to expand your sound repertoire.

In the tutorial, I use some DMC samples from the original Nintendo which you can download here. Thanks to 8bitpeoples and Null Sleep for the DMC samples.